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Dr. Phil Stansly, Professor

Teaching: Entomology

Under Dr. Phil Stansly the graduate researches in Entomology at SWFREC are focused on parasitoid fauna associated with MEAM1 in southwest Florida, improving parasitoid production and the parasitism rate in colony. Behaviors of T. radiata at different host densities. Chemical cues of host marking to avoid superparasitism by T. radiate. Optimal diets for egg formation in female parasitoid. Determining if T. radiata carries HLB bacteria after consuming HLB confected D. citri hosts. And the study of the Asian Citrus Psyllid movement and distribution patterns in citrus as well as the use of reflective mulch in progressive young citrus tree production systems.

Entomology Students

Xulin Chen
 
Xulin Chen, Entomology Student

Research Topic: Biology of Tamarixia radiata (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), parasitoid of the Citrus Greening Disease Vector Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae)

Xulin Chen was born on May 27, 1988 in Shandong Province, China. She began her undergraduate study in Shandong Agriculture University majoring in Plant Quarantine in 2007. After she graduated in July, 2011, she started her graduate study in University of Florida, Entomology and Nematology department under the supervision of Dr. Phil Stansly. She completed her Masters in May 2013 and enrolled in the PhD program under the supervision of Dr. Phil Stansly.

Tamarixia radiata (Waterston) (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), is an arrhenotokous ectoparasite of the Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) Diaphorina citri (Kuwayama) (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), vector of citrus greening disease or huanglongbing (HLB). My research is mainly focused on 1) improving parasitoid production and the parasitism rate in colony, which includes environment conditions (humidity and light duration and intensity) and provision of artificial diets; 2) behaviors of T. radiata at different host densities; 3) chemical cues of host marking to avoid superparasitism by T. radiata; 4) optimal diets for egg formation in female parasitoid; 5) whether T. radiata carries HLB bacteria after consuming HLB confected D. citri hosts.

Scott Croxton
 

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Research Topic: Psyllid Movement and Distribution in Florida Citrus

Scott Croxton started work in the field of Entomology while rearing weevils as a student employee for the Entomology Department at Auburn University and subsequently worked with mosquitoes and the transmission of West Nile Virus. Scott received a Bachelors in Horticulture with a minor in Entomology (2002-2005, Auburn University) followed by a Masters in Horticulture studying thrips’ transmission of tomato spotted wilt virus in tomatoes (2005-2008, Auburn University).

Scott is currently studying the Asian Citrus Psyllid movement and distribution patterns in citrus as well as the use of reflective mulch in progressive young citrus tree production systems at the SWFREC while working towards a Ph.D. in Entomology at the University of Florida.Panel 2. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat.

Zachary Lahey
 

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Research Topic: The Parasitoids of Bemisia tabaci in southwest Florida: Faunal Composition, Host-Plant Preference, and Interspecific Competition'

Bemisia tabaci Middle East-Asia Minor 1 (MEAM1; formerly biotype B or Bemisia argentifolii Bellows and Perring) is an exotic invasive pest of world agriculture that has been present in Florida since the early 1980s. Initial control efforts were met with great difficulty due to the whitefly’s capacity to develop resistance to pesticides, its highly polyphagous nature, ability to invade non-agricultural landscapes, and escape from natural control agents. In the early 1990s foreign explorations were made to discover parasitic wasps for control of MEAM1 in Florida. From 1990 – 1994 releases were made of the imported wasps, but knowledge related to their establishment and control potential are lacking. Lahey'sresearch focuses on the parasitoid fauna associated with MEAM1 in southwest Florida since the last survey was conducted some 15 years ago. The incidence of parasitism, host-plant associations, and determination of the species reared from MEAM1 in southwest Florida are being determined to evaluate the efficacy of the classical biological control program initiated over 20 years ago. In addition, the influence of interspecific competition between whitefly parasitoids is being investigated in the laboratory with implications for biological control and species coexistence.

Thomson Paris
 

Thomson Paris, Entomology Student

Research Topic: Flight Behavior of The Asian Citrus Psyllid Diaphorina Citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae)

Thomson Paris was born on November 10, 1984 in Loma Linda, CA. He completed his undergraduate study in Biology in December of 2007 majoring in Biology at Southern Adventist University.

After he graduated in May, 2008, he started graduate study at the University of Florida, Entomology and Nemaotlogy department under the supervision of Dr. Andrei Sourakov. He completed his Masters in May 2011 and enrolled in the PhD program under the supervision of Dr. Phil Stansly.

The Asian Citrus Psyllid (ACP), Diaphorina citri Kus (Hemiptera: Liviidae), is an insect that vectors citrus greening disease, Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus. Thomson's research is centered on the following items 1) morphometric analyses of ACP wings to evaluate possible seasonal, spatial, host plant, or environmental effects on wing size and shape in the field; 2) the characterization of morphological variation under different rearing conditions; 3) the evaluation of light choice (including wavelength, polarization and visual patterns) of psyllids for flight and landing behavior; 4) the assessment of factors such as age, sex and environmental rearing conditions that affect ACP response to light and flight duration; 5) the documentation of circadian genes in ACP and daily rhythms of ACP flight and feeding behavior.

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Professor - Entomology